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May. 2008

All project content from Outside the Box dated May, 2008.


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Title & Details

Extract

Surprises

  • Extent of innovation related to the Internet search and especially Google. Its in the miracle category, an unbelievably smart company. Its mix of algorithm, technological expertise, its understanding of users and burgeoning range of new services is the most revolutionary application of communications.
  • Would have thought the new media would have undermined the old media much more than

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Surprises

No real surprises, perhaps slowness of IPTV to take off

Technology

  • IPTV in Australia different from rest of world (France, Italy, Hong Kong, US) where digital broadcast pay-TV channels on IPTV drives high ARPU. Enables triple play (digital tv, broadband, voice), but in Australia cable and satellite are still more economically viable than IPTV.
  • Cost of IPTV coming

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Key words and themes

Media portability; wireless expectations; “snacking” versus sustainable content; shifts in free trade, globalisation, local and protected markets; revisions to the relationship/funding structures between the free to airs and the independent production sector; “sharing the risk”.

Surprises

  • The portability of media and its responsiveness to location for information and entertainment not imagined 10 years ago.
  • Truncation

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Surprises

  • storage capacity and how it changes relationship with content which is now portable and shareable
  • Total portability as in iPhone/multiplatform accessibility as in Apple TV.
  • Engagement with content
  • Intensity of engagement
  • Consumer initiation (uses “Lost” as an example of complex community interaction delivering new content in ways unintended by the original creators. Asks how now those interactions might

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Transcript of a May 2008 episode of ABC Radio National‘s Saturday Breakfast programme in which presenter Geraldine Doogue interviews Jock Given, Professor, Media and Communications at the Institute of Social Research at Swinburne University.
Saturday Breakfast RN – Broadband End Game? (External link – abc.net.au)


This interview is predominantly about issues which fall under our heading of “Governance” and digital content rights management.
First, a brief history of previous occasions in which the Film and TV industry has proclaimed the imminent end of the world as we know it!

  • Around 1980 the “video boom”. Hysterical over-reaction to Beta and VHS which would be the

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Surprises:

  • How slowly things have developed
  • How far interactivity has developed
  • Total failure of subscription model for online content
  • Power of the idea of ‘free’
  • More advertising where that came from – engine clearly there

Technology:

  • Bandwidth is the only thing holding back IPTV services

People:

  • Don’t underestimate the power of the idea of ‘free’

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Surprise

  • Most elements of digital platform were in place prior to 2000 – a surprise that was not surprising
  • The 3D Web is coming
  • Doomsday scenario – 9/11 scenario where the Internet is taken or significant parts of it are through exploitation of network weaknesses.
  • Management needs to learn adaptive strategies –to work with digital content and delivery, managers

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Surprises

  • Strength of PayTV
  • Great appeal of consumer equipment and HD
  • Environmental impacts (power use etc)
  • Individualism (no. of devices in individual’s private space/room).

People

  • People will still want pre-scheduled services and streamed entertainment as part of their a/v mix. Very efficient delivery for consumers as well as advertisers.
  • The five channel 24/7 delivery structure very hard

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Surprises

  • Technology and delivery is as important (and more so for his company) than production of content
  • TV will still be in the corner – but will be connected to a computer as well as DTV network, and probably wireless network
  • Major traffic problem with just two main cables from US to Australia. 65% of online traffic to Australia

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